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#46 RE: Arbeiten und Leben ohne Behördenkram von dbo73 01.03.2012 18:03

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Hmm, auf meine generelle Frage kam bisher kein Feedback - da hab ich mich halt mal selbst auf die Suche gemacht und untenstehende Infos im CIC Manual FW 1 (Foreign Worker Manual) im Kapitel 5.1 gefunden, welche meine beiden Beispiele nicht als illegale Arbeitsaufnahme definiert. Dachte, dies koennte den einen oder anderen User hier interessieren.

Zitat
Definition of “Work” [R2]

“Work” is defined in the Regulations as an activity for which wages are paid or commission is
earned, or that competes directly with activities of Canadian citizens or permanent residents in the
Canadian labour market.


“ Wages or commission”

This includes salary or wages paid by an employer to an employee, remuneration or commission
received for fulfilling a service contract, or any other situation where a foreign national receives
payment for performing a service.

What is an activity that “competes directly”?

Officers should consider whether there is entry into the labour market. Questions to consider:
• Will they be doing an activity that a Canadian or permanent resident should really have an
opportunity to do?
• Will they be engaging in a business activity that is competitive in the marketplace?
FW 1 Temporary Foreign Worker Guidelines
2011-01-20 Page 22 of 186
If the answer to either of these questions is ‘yes’, the foreign national intends to engage in a
competitive activity, which would be considered “work”.

Examples of “work” include, but are not limited to:
• a foreign technician coming to repair a machine, or otherwise fulfil a contract, even when they
will not be paid directly by the Canadian company for whom they are doing the work;
• self-employment, which could constitute a competitive economic activity such as opening a
dry- cleaning shop or fast-food franchise. (A self-employed person may also be considered to
be working if they receive a commission or payment for services);
• unpaid employment undertaken for the purpose of obtaining work experience, such as an
internship or practicum normally done by a student.
What kind of activities are not considered to be “work”?
• An activity which does not really ‘take away’ from opportunities for Canadians or permanent
residents to gain employment or experience in the workplace is not “work” for the purposes of
the definition.

Examples of activities for which a person would not normally be remunerated or which
would not compete directly with Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents in the
Canadian labour market and which would normally be part-time or incidental to the reason
that the person is in Canada include, but are not limited to:
• volunteer work for which a person would not normally be remunerated, such as sitting on the
board of a charity or religious institution; being a ‘big brother’ or ‘big sister’ to a child; being on
the telephone line at a rape crisis centre. (Normally this activity would be part time and
incidental to the main reason that a person is in Canada);
• unremunerated help by a friend or family member during a visit, such as a mother assisting a
daughter with childcare, or an uncle helping his nephew build his own cottage;
long distance (by telephone or internet) work done by a temporary resident whose employer
is outside Canada and who is remunerated from outside Canada;

self-employment where the work to be done would have no real impact on the labour market,
nor really provide an opportunity for Canadians.
Examples include a U.S. farmer crossing the
border to work on fields that he owns, or a miner coming to work on his own claim.
There may be other types of unpaid short-term work where the work is really incidental to the
main reason that a person is visiting Canada and is not a competitive activity, even though nonmonetary
valuable consideration is received. For instance, if a tourist wishes to stay on a family
farm and work part time just for room and board for a short period (i.e., 1-4 weeks), this person
would not be considered a worker.

We recognize that there may be overlap in activities that we do not consider to be work and those
activities which are defined as work not requiring a work permit in R186. However, the net effect
(no work permit required) is the same.

#47 RE: Arbeiten und Leben ohne Behördenkram von maxim 01.03.2012 18:15

hallo

du hast in deinem text aber einen punkt übersehen und der ist wichtig - siehe in blau gekennzeichnet.

Zitat von dbo73
Hmm, auf meine generelle Frage kam bisher kein Feedback - da hab ich mich halt mal selbst auf die Suche gemacht und untenstehende Infos im CIC Manual FW 1 (Foreign Worker Manual) im Kapitel 5.1 gefunden, welche meine beiden Beispiele nicht als illegale Arbeitsaufnahme definiert. Dachte, dies koennte den einen oder anderen User hier interessieren.

Zitat
Definition of “Work” [R2]

“Work” is defined in the Regulations as an activity for which wages are paid or commission is
earned, or that competes directly with activities of Canadian citizens or permanent residents in the
Canadian labour market.


“ Wages or commission”

This includes salary or wages paid by an employer to an employee, remuneration or commission
received for fulfilling a service contract, or any other situation where a foreign national receives
payment for performing a service.

What is an activity that “competes directly”?

Officers should consider whether there is entry into the labour market. Questions to consider:
• Will they be doing an activity that a Canadian or permanent resident should really have an
opportunity to do?
• Will they be engaging in a business activity that is competitive in the marketplace?
FW 1 Temporary Foreign Worker Guidelines
2011-01-20 Page 22 of 186
If the answer to either of these questions is ‘yes’, the foreign national intends to engage in a
competitive activity, which would be considered “work”.

Examples of “work” include, but are not limited to:
• a foreign technician coming to repair a machine, or otherwise fulfil a contract, even when they
will not be paid directly by the Canadian company for whom they are doing the work;
• self-employment, which could constitute a competitive economic activity such as opening a
dry- cleaning shop or fast-food franchise. (A self-employed person may also be considered to
be working if they receive a commission or payment for services);
• unpaid employment undertaken for the purpose of obtaining work experience, such as an
internship or practicum normally done by a student.
What kind of activities are not considered to be “work”?
• An activity which does not really ‘take away’ from opportunities for Canadians or permanent
residents to gain employment or experience in the workplace is not “work” for the purposes of
the definition.

Examples of activities for which a person would not normally be remunerated or which
would not compete directly with Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents in the
Canadian labour market and which would normally be part-time or incidental to the reason
that the person is in Canada include, but are not limited to:
• volunteer work for which a person would not normally be remunerated, such as sitting on the
board of a charity or religious institution; being a ‘big brother’ or ‘big sister’ to a child; being on
the telephone line at a rape crisis centre. (Normally this activity would be part time and
incidental to the main reason that a person is in Canada);
• unremunerated help by a friend or family member during a visit,[/size] such as a mother assisting a
daughter with childcare, or an uncle helping his nephew build his own cottage;
long distance (by telephone or internet) work done by a temporary resident whose employer
is outside Canada and who is remunerated from outside Canada;

self-employment where the work to be done would have no real impact on the labour market,
nor really provide an opportunity for Canadians.
Examples include a U.S. farmer crossing the
border to work on fields that he owns, or a miner coming to work on his own claim.
There may be other types of unpaid short-term work where the work is really incidental to the
main reason that a person is visiting Canada and is not a competitive activity, even though nonmonetary
valuable consideration is received. For instance, if a tourist wishes to stay on a family
farm and work part time just for room and board [size=150]for a short period (i.e., 1-4 weeks),
this person
would not be considered a worker.

We recognize that there may be overlap in activities that we do not consider to be work and those
activities which are defined as work not requiring a work permit in R186. However, the net effect
(no work permit required) is the same.


#48 RE: Arbeiten und Leben ohne Behördenkram von coffee bean 01.03.2012 22:04

avatar

Totally off topic, muss aber sein.

Hilft vieleicht auch zum abkuehlen der gemueter

Three old friends, an Irishman, a Greek and a Spaniard go into a pub for a few pints.
The waitress brings the beer and asks,”WHO IS PAYING ?”
They all smile and chime into together ,”GERMANY"!
.
.
.

Ok, carry on folks...................

#49 RE: Arbeiten und Leben ohne Behördenkram von 15.03.2012 02:13

Nachtrag !

http://workandtravelforum.siteboard.de/w...-about2852.html

Zitat
Hallo.
Bin auf der Suche nach Hilfe gegen Bezahlung.
Habe eine kleine Firma im Süden von Nova Scotia.
Ich baue u.a. kleine Ferienhäuser aus Holz für Grundstückseigentümer vornehmlich aus Europa.
Wer Interesse hat und handwerklich nicht gerade unbegabt ist, kann sich melden. Unterkunft ist nicht das Problem.
Worum es geht könnt Ihr auf

http://kanada-ns.com

sehen. E-mail Adresse gibt es dort natürlich auch

Franki

#50 RE: Arbeiten und Leben ohne Behördenkram von 22.04.2012 19:40

http://www.kanada-forum.net/vorstellungs...ranki-t540.html


Aber das beste ist doch :
Das war mit Registrierung und Gebühr von 130,- Can$ in drei Tagen erledigt. Hat den Vorteil dass ich von da an ohne Arbeitserlaubnis überall legal gegen Rechnung arbeiten kann. Ausserdem kann ich jetzt solange in Kanada bleiben wie ich möchte da ich offiziell kein Tourist mehr bin.

Warum sind alle so bloed und warten auf ein PR Visum 5 Jahre ?

#51 RE: Arbeiten und Leben ohne Behördenkram von dbo73 23.04.2012 14:26

avatar

Hey,

Wir haben versucht, es ihm zu erklären. Mehr geht halt und lohnt sich nicht

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